You are hereThe Nature of the Resurrection According to 1Corinthians 15

The Nature of the Resurrection According to 1Corinthians 15

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By SuperSoulFighter - Posted on 06 August 2004

by John McPherson
This issue is currently being hotly contested among several of my fellow Preterists here at this site, and I felt that presenting my own position in a clear and concise manner might add some new dimension to the ongoing discussion. Perhaps some middle ground can be found between polarized views.This issue is currently being hotly contested among several of my fellow Preterists here at this site, and I felt that presenting my own position in a clear and concise manner might add some new dimension to the ongoing discussion. Perhaps some middle ground can be found between polarized views.This chapter introduces the subject of the resurrection as a shift in focus from issues pertaining to corporate worship (the first fourteen chapters of the book, which also include some instruction concerning personal, individual values judgments and the basis for them). In chapter 15, Paul shifts his focus to the gospel itself, which formed the basis for his own ministry and the fledgling faith of the Corinthian Christians.


It is highly significant that Paul opens this examination of the gospel – and the resurrection’s role in it – by referencing Christ’s PERSON. He clearly states, in v.3, that “…Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures”. Paul does not go into specific details here, concerning which parts of Christ’s Being experienced death or in what form they experienced it. Rather, he states plainly that Christ Jesus Himself – as a Person – experienced death. He goes on, in v.4, to state, “And that he was buried, and that he rose again the third day according to the Scriptures”. It is natural to view this text in terms of a reference to Christ’s physical body that died on the cross. After all, that body was placed in the tomb, which was a form of burial. It was from that tomb that He issued, seemingly, on the third day. So there should be no room for confusion or alternative interpretation here. But let us consider this possibility. In keeping with Paul’s focus on Christ’s PERSON – is it not possible that God’s sending His soul/spirit to Sheol was a form of burial in itself? Certainly, the concept of “rising” lends itself more closely to the idea of one’s soul/spirit rising from “the place of the dead” (where the other, pre-resurrection saints/”elect”/”just”) were held in waiting. Samuel, when he appeared to Saul at the witch of Endor’s house, was said to “ascend out of the earth” (1Samuel 28:12-14). We know that his physical body didn’t rise at this time, so it is logical to conclude that his disembodied soul/spirit was kept somewhere, awaiting the resurrection (at which time they could be called forth, to rise into the full presence of God, forever). His soul/spirit was allowed to make a brief appearance to Saul, in order to communicate a message of judgment from God. But Samuel was required to return to a "sleep condition" in a "disembodied state" after his interaction with Saul. Note Samuel's words to Saul, in 1Samuel 28:15, "Why hast thou disquieted me, to BRING ME UP?"


But let us continue with our examination of the chapter under immediate consideration. Verses 5-8 read as follows, “5 and that He was seen by Cephas, then by the twelve. 6 After that He was seen by over five hundred brethren at once, of whom the greater part remain to the present, but some have fallen asleep. 7 After that He was seen by James, then by all the apostles. 8 Then last of all He was seen by me also, as by one born out of due time.” Two things are of particular interest here. One is that Paul emphasizes the fact that Jesus was SEEN by these followers of His. He does not state that His physical, pre-death body was seen, handled, interacted with in a highly physical way. Rather, the emphasis is on the VISIBILITY of Christ’s Person to His followers. There is no question as to His identity. It was truly their Lord who had arisen from the “place of the death”. But the other point of interest is that NOWHERE in the Scriptures do we have any record of ONE sighting of Christ’s post-resurrection form by a non-believer or one who was not a follower of His. Surely, if He possessed a physical body like the one He had in His pre-death ministry and life, He would be readily visible to all who happened to encounter Him (on the road to Emmaus, for example). He was a highly public figure and well-known in those days, according to the accounts presented in the Gospels. Surely some note would have been made of His incidental encounter with one who was NOT one of His followers. But such was not the case. In fact, in the case of Paul (as referenced in v.8), those with him heard a voice but SAW NO-ONE SPEAKING (Acts 1:7)!


Paul makes a few personal observations concerning his own ministry in vss. 9-11, then returns to his examination of the resurrection concept. It is here that we find particularly strong evidence against the idea that Paul has a covenantal concept in mind. In vss. 12-19, Paul develops a rhetorical argument, emphasizing the logical outcome of denial of the resurrection. The whole focus is not on the NATURE of the resurrection, here, so much as the reality that their ministries and preaching were founded on the reality and firm belief that God raised Christ “from the dead”. In OTHER words, their ministries did not have their foundation on whether or not Christ Jesus was revitalized PHYSICALLY, but whether His “raising from the dead” as an entity or person was factual or fictional.


Verse 19 particularly emphasizes the contrast between “this life” (Paul’s reference to the blessedness of fellowship with God through Christ while physically alive) and “the next” (which, if Christ’s resurrection were not a reality, would involve continued separation from the Presence of God in Sheol with the other saints of the “seed of Abraham” by faith). Verse 20, however, powerfully affirms the reality that Christ Jesus had, indeed, “risen from the dead” (again, notice the absence of any specific reference to His physical reanimation/restoration/quickening in bringing His pre-crucifixion body back to life). Christ’s resurrection established the form and pattern which those of the remainder of the saints (in Sheol) would follow. Verses 21,22 draw parallels between the bias toward sin which Adam introduced into the human race (thus creating a spiritual separation between God and man, finding its ultimate expression in the “imprisoning” of the souls of God’s “elect” and “just” in Sheol, until the resurrection), and Christ’s introduction of spiritual release for these spiritual “captives”.


Verse 23 confirms that the actual resurrection would occur at His “coming”. His Return (Parousia) would involve this very event (among others), and as we know – this occurred @70 AD.


Verse 24 speaks to Christ’s subjecting all “rule, authority and power”, referencing the authorities and powers of the destroyed “Old Covenant Jewish world”.


Verse 25 speaks of Christ’s reign including the final overthrow of His “enemies” (the Jewish leaders, particularly those directly responsible for His crucifixion and the ongoing attempts to destroy His Church at that time).


Verse 26 speaks of the “final enemy”, “death” being destroyed. The “place of the dead” is what, I believe, is in view here. When hell/gehenna and Sheol were destroyed in 70 AD (cf. Rev. 20:14), then this verse was fulfilled and accomplished.


Verses 27,28 describe the final reconciling of “all things” unto God through the consummation of His Son’s reign. The spiritual “world” initiated in Christ Jesus and founded upon His Word and His Church would be fully established at this time, with God alone as Sovereign.


The importance of the resurrection (for these First Century believers in particular) in all of this cannot be overstated. This is Paul’s point in vss.29-34. Again, it is not the nature of the form Christ possessed in His post-resurrection state that is at issue here. It is the resurrection ITSELF, in terms of the location and RElocation of the PERSONS involved that Paul is focussed on here. The role all of this plays in the Master Plan of God eschatologically is glorious and Paul is eager to impress this reality upon the minds of his readers. This was THEIR hope, and THEIR motivator to live the lives of faith required of them.


Paul finds the issue of the NATURE of the form assumed by those in their post-resurrection state both mundane and unwise to inquire into. It is of far less significance than the relocation of the saints in Sheol from the “place of the dead” to glorious, conscious life with God for eternity. Verses 35-38 establish a very simple lesson. It is not easy to definitively identify the exact FORM and SUBSTANCE which the resurrected believer will experience as the manifestation of his/her PERSON in the resurrected state. Just as a seed will die and disintegrate in the ground, providing the opportunity for life in the form of a plant, God sovereignly bestows a form for each and every resurrected person according to His own wisdom. Just as the seed and the plant are completely dissimilar in form, so the form granted to the resurrected person and the physical body the leave behind in the grave are completely different.


Verses 39-44 compare the differences between the various different PHYSICAL “bodies” which are so drastically dissimilar (contrasting earthly bodies with celestial ones, animals with people, etc.). Verses 42-44 in particular speak to the impossibility of DEFINITIVELY establishing the specific differences between all of these “forms” or “bodies” we are so familiar with, let alone those we haven’t experienced yet.


Verse 45 makes mention of Adam’s being granted physical life, thus becoming a “living soul”, with the ability (through procreation) to pass on physical life to others. Christ, on the other hand, became the “second Adam”, being granted SPIRITUAL LIFE – ETERNAL life – thus becoming a “quickening spirit” with the ability to spiritually “procreate” in passing on His spiritual life to His followers (all those who believe). This included the ability to raise from Sheol those who demonstrated obedient faith in God in the pre-resurrection period of history, after which the “place of death” (spiritual death/separation from God) was terminated.


Verses 46-50 re-emphasize the drastic, supernatural differences between the physical, “earthy” state and the eternal, “heavenly” state. Those who had not experienced the spiritually transforming work of Christ and His gospel within them (and who had no hope of the resurrection) were “earthy”. Their interests and concerns were in the physical life alone. They had no eternal place in God’s Presence to anticipate. The “corruption” spoken of by Paul in v.50 is not precisely a condemnation of the physical body enjoyed in this life, in a “gnostic” sense. Rather, he is referring to the fact that the physical body ultimately dies and returns to dust. It becomes “corrupted” and is, in essence, temporal. “Corruption” and “incorruption” simply contrasts the durability of the physical body vs. the spiritual, heavenly one. The post-mortem expectations for one over the other are completely opposite. Thus, the “corruptible” physical body has no place in the spiritual Kingdom of God after this life (the place of “resurrection” where the resurrected saints would spend eternity). Their inheritance was in heaven with God, and only their incorruptible souls/spirits would be allowed to enter there.


Verses 51 and 52 get as specific as Paul was able to (under the provision of the Holy Spirit’s inspiration). Obviously, God had no desire to spoil the surprise of Resurrection Day for His First Century saints. But v.52 DOES speak to the nature of this resurrection in its understatement and LACK of specifics. “The dead” (the souls in Sheol) would be raised “incorruptible”. There is no mention of physical bodies being reconstituted from the soil into which they had disintegrated (most of them). NO mention of their being restored to pre-physical death bodies whatsoever. Rather, they are raised in their incorruptible, SPIRITUAL state, and given NEW forms – SPIRITUAL, HEAVENLY ones.


“and we shall be changed”. Did Paul foresee in this inclusion of himself with “the dead” that he wouldn’t survive, physically, unto this event? It’s certainly possible. I believe he may have been speaking prophetically, here, concerning his own, physical death before the resurrection, and that he would be numbered among “the dead” who would be raised from Sheol. The other possibility, of course, is that the living saints of that period were the ones Paul had in view in the statement, “we shall all be changed”. In keeping with his emphasis on the shedding of the “corruptible”, physical body in exchange for an “incorruptible”, spiritual one – it follows that those saints who were alive at the time of the resurrection, and joined “the raised dead” in the Presence of God, had their physical bodies disposed of (removed in the twinkling of an eye), to be replaced with heavenly, incorruptible, spiritual ones – just like the resurrected dead. Paul anticipates this event, not so much in terms of the SHEDDING of his corruptible, fleshly body, but in view of his “being clothed” with an incorruptible, eternal, spiritual form. “Death” (the place of spiritual death – Sheol) would be swallowed up in the glorious victory of the release of the dead saints there into the eternal freedom of incorruptible, spiritual, resurrected forms, ever present with God.


Verses 55-57 pinpoint the implications in Paul’s terminology beyond any doubt. “Death” had a “sting” and the “grave” had a temporal power over the faithful saints of God after their physical lives had come to an end – up until the resurrection. At the resurrection, death’s “sting” would no longer have any power, and likewise the “grave” would be denied its ultimate victory over these saints. Sheol would no longer be tolerated as a place where God’s beloved saints would be forced to remain separate from Him. The “law” (the Mosaic Covenant) gave strength to sin and death, and necessitated the existence of Sheol. But the “law” was fulfilled in Christ and no longer had jurisdiction over the post-mortem experience of the saints of God.


The labors of the saints in the First Century, during their physical lives, was “not in vain” (v.58), since they had the resurrection to look forward to, rather than a time of indefinite waiting in Sheol.


Thus concludes this brief overview of 1Corinthians 15. I would love to go into much greater detail on some of these things, because this homily is by no means a passage in isolation unto itself in the Scriptures. As we know, NO passage of Scripture has that characteristic. Paul was speaking specifically to resurrection expectations and hopes harbored by Old Covenant Israelites for centuries. THEY spoke of their forefathers who had “fallen asleep”. THEY used terminology like this to communicate the awareness that this “sleep condition” (in a disembodied, spiritual state) was TEMPORAL. There would come a day when their forefathers would be awakened and permitted to enter the glorious Presence of the God of Israel.


Developing this in a more thorough manner, however, would involve a lengthy book. Time and space permit no more than has been presented, above, for the careful, meditative, studious reflection of my fellow Preterist brethren here on Planet Preterist. May our Saviour’s Truth be manifest and glorified in our deliberations here, together.


Serving the Truth,

John McPherson

Seeker's picture

I submit that Paul's statement that the physical bodies of those left alive at Christ's return is accurately depicted as CHANGED physical bodies. Scripture does not support your idea of disposed, or removed bodies, but clearly changed physical bodies.

It is a gnostic idea that Christ's body, both before and/or after his resurrection, was, in reality, only a 'spiritual form.' That idea was knocked down 2000 years ago. You are leading people down a path that was deemed heretical then and remains so now.

Seeker

SuperSoulFighter's picture

We are all aware that you staunchly defend the "church"'s orthodox position, Zorro (which, in itself, is heretical in terms of the original orthodoxy of the NT apostles and saints as far as I'm concerned).

Whoever "knocked down this idea 2000 years ago" (try a couple of hundred years more recently than that), I'm rather confident that they weren't confronted with these arguments precisely as I have presented them here - and the entire political and social climate was different. It was a different "world" back then. Sorry you wish you lived back then.

Talk to you in a week.

John

JRP's picture

Actually, the battle with the gnostics during the most early days of the church WAS settled back then. It all had to do with christology. So it isn't that I wish to live back then, I just don't want to see people making those same mistakes that were settled long ago. But, then again, people who don't know their history are doomed to repeat it...

But boldness without truth will never make a Christian confessor: and if a man injures himself for the love of error, he is not a martyr but a suicide. William A. Jones

Erick's picture

Thank you John for your article, it was very helpful. I am curious about a few statements though and if you (or anyone else) has some time I'd appreciate some further insight. Thanks again...

You said:
“Surely, if He possessed a physical body like the one He had in His pre-death ministry and life, He would be readily visible to all who happened to encounter Him (on the road to Emmaus, for example).”

---I may have misunderstood your point here but, could it be that these disciples could SEE him, they just couldn't RECOGNIZE him (he “appeared in another form“)? Even before His crucifixion Jesus was able to perform miracles, why after his resurrection could he not go incognito? That doesn't seem like such a difficult task to the man who also walked on water in his physical body. Isn’t your point that Christ presented himself to believers largely an argument from silence? I don’t see why he COULD NOT have shown himself to unbelievers (I too don‘t believe he had any REASON to, but that doesn‘t hinder his ability). Another question I’ll just throw out there is this-- If Paul saw the GLORIFIED Christ on the Damascus road, he saw him first as an unbeliever, no? If he didn’t see Christ then was he truly an Apostle? - Were the Apostles “believers” before they saw the risen Christ? If not then didn’t He then appear to unbelievers? Frankly I have trouble seeing why it matters if Christ appeared to believers or unbelievers, sincerely, is it really a vital point in the debate?

You said:
"In OTHER words, their ministries did not have their foundation on whether or not Christ Jesus was revitalized PHYSICALLY, but whether His “raising from the dead” as an entity or person was factual or fictional.

---Thomas’ ministry did seem to have this foundation, to which Christ replied, “Behold my hands and my feet, that it is I Myself. Handle Me and see, for a spirit does not have FLESH and BONES as you SEE I have… Anybody got some food!” (Lk. 24:39).

You said:
"Paul finds the issue of the NATURE of the form assumed by those in their post-resurrection state both mundane and unwise to inquire into."

---Did he find the question mundane and unwise, or the fact that these particular people would be asking it? The Corinthians seemed to have a lot of issues with things that ought to have been common “spiritual” sense. You may be right; I’m just wondering your thoughts on this.

You said:
"In keeping with his emphasis on the shedding of the “corruptible”, physical body in exchange for an “incorruptible”, spiritual one – it follows that those saints who were alive at the time of the resurrection, and joined “the raised dead” in the Presence of God, had their physical bodies disposed of (removed in the twinkling of an eye), to be replaced with heavenly, incorruptible, spiritual ones – just like the resurrected dead.

---Is this the “silence demands a rapture” approach? If it is that’s fine, I’m just curious if that’s where you’re coming from. I’m still sorting out my own convictions on this topic. Thank you sincerely for a very good article and your humble approach to presenting your views. “They will know we are Christians by our love, by our love, yes, they’ll know we are Christians by our love!”

SuperSoulFighter's picture

---I may have misunderstood your point here but, could it be that these disciples could SEE him, they just couldn't RECOGNIZE him (he “appeared in another form“)?

Hi, Erick! Good question! Yes, my point was that there didn't appear to be anyone else who noticed or recognized him, but in the instance of his appearance to the disciples on the road to Emmaus, I believe it is most likely that He DID assume a different appearance, which a SPIRIT being would be capable of, while a strictly physical body would not. In other words, if He possessed His pre-crucifixion body - even with all of the wounds of crucifixion still in it - surely both His disciples AND others who might have crossed paths with them on that road, would have recognized Him rather quickly.

Isn’t your point that Christ presented himself to believers largely an argument from silence? I don’t see why he COULD NOT have shown himself to unbelievers (I too don‘t believe he had any REASON to, but that doesn‘t hinder his ability). Another question I’ll just throw out there is this-- If Paul saw the GLORIFIED Christ on the Damascus road, he saw him first as an unbeliever, no? If he didn’t see Christ then was he truly an Apostle? - Were the Apostles “believers” before they saw the risen Christ? If not then didn’t He then appear to unbelievers? Frankly I have trouble seeing why it matters if Christ appeared to believers or unbelievers, sincerely, is it really a vital point in the debate?

It's true that Paul was an EXCEPTION, in that he was an unbeliever at the time of his encounter with Christ on the Damascus road - but this bears out the point that even though Christ COULD have made Himself visible to unbelievers and those who were not His followers, as a rule He chose NOT to. This is, indeed, a point of lesser significance than some of the actual, clear statements of Scripture. Because Paul made a point of emphasizing Jesus' VISIBILITY to specific followers of His (those who believed that He was, indeed, their Messiah), I felt that a few observations on that point were in order.

Did you get a chance to review Alan Carlson's comments in response to the article, though, above? I'd like to quote a couple of those observations here.

If Christ was raised Physically then why couldn't everyone see him and recognise him?

Acts 10:40-41
40 "(1) God raised Him up on the third day and granted that He become visible,
41 (2) not to all the people, but to (3) witnesses who were chosen beforehand by God, that is, to us (4) who ate and drank with Him after He arose from the dead.

If not all people could see him then he must have had a spiritual body and not a physical one after the ressurection.

Note that Christ was MADE VISIBLE, as His form was NOT physical and naturally visible apart from supernatural empowerment. His Being was MANIFESTED physically through God's supernatural enabling. I believe that is the true significance of Acts 10:40,41.

You said:
"In OTHER words, their ministries did not have their foundation on whether or not Christ Jesus was revitalized PHYSICALLY, but whether His “raising from the dead” as an entity or person was factual or fictional.

---Thomas’ ministry did seem to have this foundation, to which Christ replied, “Behold my hands and my feet, that it is I Myself. Handle Me and see, for a spirit does not have FLESH and BONES as you SEE I have… Anybody got some food!” (Lk. 24:39).

It's not clear that Thomas' MINISTRY was founded on any perception that Christ's pre-crucifixion body had been brought back to life, but certainly his faith was clearly awakened and confirmed through his encounter with the resurrected Christ, who verified the reality of His identity in physical terms. A mere GHOST could not have assumed physical form and done these things. But a resurrected SPIRIT BEING could. As we know, in various places in the Scriptures angels, God Himself, and other spirit beings could take on physical characteristics temporarily - even consume food. While these beings weren't RESURRECTED, it IS clear that Christ Jesus, in His post-resurrection form, joined their number, possessing a form capable of manifesting the same characteristics they did.

You said:
"Paul finds the issue of the NATURE of the form assumed by those in their post-resurrection state both mundane and unwise to inquire into."

---Did he find the question mundane and unwise, or the fact that these particular people would be asking it? The Corinthians seemed to have a lot of issues with things that ought to have been common “spiritual” sense. You may be right; I’m just wondering your thoughts on this.

I believe the common, "spiritual" sense (wisdom) you refer to dictated that people avoid fruitless speculations concerning the SUBSTANCE of the resurrected forms they would enjoy in their resurrected state. While it's true that the Corinthians had a unique level of spiritual immaturity (their spiritual understanding had not developed to the extent that was expected of them), in this particular case, Paul uses rather harsh, strong language (in his usage of the epithet "fool" - v.36) indicating his utter disdain for this unnecessary and essentially pointless avenue of inquiry. That which could be understood by them at that time should have been obvious to ANYONE, is what is implied in Paul's statements. Were the questions listed in v.35 expressions of outright unbelief, hence Paul's strong reaction? Did these questions imply that the inquirer was really scoffing at the whole idea of the resurrection based upon the obvious non-existence of the physical bodies of most of those who would be "raised"? It's certainly possible. Regardless, in Paul's development of the whole passage on the nature of the resurrected form, he does his best to avoid speculative, hypothetical treatment of the subject, and thus his conclusions remain relatively obscure. 1John 3:2 confirms the absence of a clear understanding of what their (the apostles' and First Century saints') expectations were in terms of the resurrected forms they would enjoy, "...and it doth not yet appear what we shall be, but we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him; for we shall see him as he is." Clearly, even after encountering His resurrected form, Christ's disciples/apostles and followers were unsure what His actual form was in terms of its nature and substance.

You said:
"In keeping with his emphasis on the shedding of the “corruptible”, physical body in exchange for an “incorruptible”, spiritual one – it follows that those saints who were alive at the time of the resurrection, and joined “the raised dead” in the Presence of God, had their physical bodies disposed of (removed in the twinkling of an eye), to be replaced with heavenly, incorruptible, spiritual ones – just like the resurrected dead.

---Is this the “silence demands a rapture” approach? If it is that’s fine, I’m just curious if that’s where you’re coming from. I’m still sorting out my own convictions on this topic. Thank you sincerely for a very good article and your humble approach to presenting your views. “They will know we are Christians by our love, by our love, yes, they’ll know we are Christians by our love!”

Essentially, yes, Erick. That is my position on the rapture. It certainly fits with the evidence (or lack thereof), eh? I trust some of these things have been helpful in further clarifying my views.

John

Erick's picture

Thanks again John for your article, and the clarifications; I'll keep those points in mind. The living and eternal One - Jesus Christ - bless you in your studies.

SuperSoulFighter's picture

You're very welcome, Erick! And may you be also blessed by your Sovereign, Eternal King in your studious, meditative examination of His Word. There is great reward in all of our efforts to assimilate and understand the Truth as revealed in the Word of God.

SuperSoulFighter's picture

I'm away for a week, folks! See you all when I get back!

mrfullpreterist's picture

Thanks for posting this article on the front page Mr. McPherson.

For anyone interested in discussing this and commenting on it, there is also a thread in the "Resurrection Doctrine" forum here at Planet Preterist entitled, "Was Christ's Crucified Body Reanimated And Made Alive At His Resurrection - Or Not?"

I personally believe that the scriptures teach it was.

John and I were discussing this there. Comments from others are welcome and appreciated.

Robert L. Statzer

mrFOOLpreterist FKA as mrfullpreterist

Still searching to understand the Truth.

rusureofit's picture

If Christ was raised Physically then why couldn't everyone see him and recognise him?

Acts 10:40-41
40 "(1) God raised Him up on the third day and granted that He become visible,
41 (2) not to all the people, but to (3) witnesses who were chosen beforehand by God, that is, to us (4) who ate and drank with Him after He arose from the dead.

If not all people could see him then he must have had a spiritual body and not a physical one after the ressurection.

1 Corinthians 15:50
I declare to you, brothers, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God, nor does the perishable inherit the imperishable.

If this verse is true how does a physical body get to heaven?

2 Corinthians 5:1-10 NLT

New Bodies

1For we know that when this earthly tent we live in is taken down--when we die and leave these bodies--we will have a home in heaven, an eternal body made for us by God himself and not by human hands. 2We grow weary in our present bodies, and we long for the day when we will put on our heavenly bodies like new clothing. 3For we will not be spirits without bodies, but we will put on new heavenly bodies. 4Our dying bodies make us groan and sigh, but it's not that we want to die and have no bodies at all. We want to slip into our new bodies so that these dying bodies will be swallowed up by everlasting life. 5God himself has prepared us for this, and as a guarantee he has given us his Holy Spirit.
6So we are always confident, even though we know that as long as we live in these bodies we are not at home with the Lord. 7That is why we live by believing and not by seeing. 8Yes, we are fully confident, and we would rather be away from these bodies, for then we will be at home with the Lord. 9So our aim is to please him always, whether we are here in this body or away from this body. 10For we must all stand before Christ to be judged. We will each receive whatever we deserve for the good or evil we have done in our bodies.

There has never been a physical body that any person with good eyes couldn't see, and there has never been a spiritual body that any person with good eyes could see unless it was granted by God.
Alan Carlson

SuperSoulFighter's picture

Amen, Alan! You and I are definitely on the same page. Spiritual "forms" or "bodies" have nothing to do with the physical bodies people possess before their physical deaths. In this physical, material realm we have bodies that are of a substance defined by molecular structures composed of atoms. In the hereafter, when these physical bodies have returned to the dust, those who are granted access to the Presence of God by virute of citizenship in His Kingdom will have forms completely dissimilar to these physical ones.

Your choice of Scriptures, above, was excellent, Alan. Thank you for presenting these thoughts.

John

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