You are hereMainline churches' silence on Armageddon fuels doomsday jitters

Mainline churches' silence on Armageddon fuels doomsday jitters

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By EWMI - Posted on 15 January 2005

by Albert Persohn
"Mainline churches, nevertheless, proclaim belief in Jesus' return, even while rejecting doomsday hysteria. They should join the debate, change the theological climate and give people hope.""Mainline churches, nevertheless, proclaim belief in Jesus' return, even while rejecting doomsday hysteria. They should join the debate, change the theological climate and give people hope."This article appeared in the January 15 internet edition of the tennessean.com.

DOOMSDAY JITTERS

As a kid growing up in Louisiana, I scanned the sky with amazement and dread. Ultimate sky-filling news, we were told, could arrive any moment, any of three ways — from tornadoes, Russian missiles or Jesus Christ returning in thunderous glory.

We kids learned about tornadoes from the Wizard of Oz, the USSR from school and the second coming from tracts on the windshield. Radio preachers kept the fascination aflame for biblical apocalypse. The '70s were alive with prophecy experts. The United Nations was the Beast in the book of Revelation. Christians would be raptured to heaven. Boils and spiritual slavery awaited everyone else. Then Jesus would split the eastern skies and do battle against monstrous evil once and for all. It would happen in 1974, a generation after the birth of the state of Israel. The energy crisis and Comet Kohoutek were scary, unmistakable signs. It's right there in the Bible.

To Read The Rest Copy and Paste This Link Into Your Browser Address Bar:

http://www.tennessean.com/local/archives/05/01/64166355.shtml?Element_ID=64166355

Perhaps someone from Planet Preterist should contact the author

chrisliv's picture

Yeah,

It's mainstream media articles like these that are ripe for a Preterist mention:

"Most church historians say today's apocalyptic interpretation of Scripture (called pre-millennial dispensationalism) sprang from the promotional efforts of a few 19th-century Protestant agitators. Mainstream scholarship, and mainstream churches, have mostly ignored and disdained the obsession with Armageddon."

Writers like these have done enough background to articulate the recent concept of "pre-mil" and "dispensational" and they are finding those ideas to be irrational and destructive. And we, Preterists, know those positions to be unbiblical, too.

It probably won't be long before writers in daily newspapers get a grasp of, and then mention the Preterist position as a biblical and sane alternative for "doomsday jitters."

Peace to you all,
C. Livingstone

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