You are hereHebrew tablet tells of resurrection before Jesus

Hebrew tablet tells of resurrection before Jesus

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By Virgil - Posted on 06 July 2008

A stone tablet written in Hebrew is generating debate as some scholars are saying its words point to a suffering messiah who was killed and rose again three days later decades before Jesus of Nazareth. Daniel Boyarin, a professor of Talmudic culture at the University of California at Berkeley told The International Herald Tribune, "Some Christians will find it shocking – a challenge to the uniqueness of their theology – while others will be comforted by the idea of it being a traditional part of Judaism."The tablet itself, about three feet tall and containing 87 lines of Hebrew in two neat columns, is a rare find because its words are written in ink, rather than engraved. Experts who have analyzed the writing date the stone from the late first century B.C., and a chemical examination conducted by a professor at Tel Aviv University showed no reason to doubt the date.

The content of the writing, however, remains much in doubt, as evidenced by a handful of articles on the stone and several due to be published in coming months.

Click to read the entire article

Mick's picture

I am not sure that I get it. So what if the ancient Hebrews understood that their Messiah would rise from the dead after 3 days. That could be understood from the OT scriptures. The key is did the followers of Simon risk their lives and fortunes on the belief that he did raise from the dead.

Mickey E. Denen

Kyle Peterson's picture

I'd really like to know if this tablet actually names "Simon" as the person of the prophecy. Rather, I think Knohl just threw out the name because it fits his long-time Jewish conspiracy.

Knohl mentions the Simon spoken of by Josephus. Simon of Peraea lived in the Transjordan area and led a band of rebel Jews. After Herod died in 4BCE he declared himself king but was shortly killed afterwards. Simon (of Peraea) had no Messianic considerations whatsoever. A huge stretch by Knohl.

However, people have been confusing the above Simon with Simon bar Kosiba who led a revolt in 132AD and did have Messianic consideration. However, after his failed revolt he was deemed not to be the Messiah. In any case, this was 100 yrs after Christ in which its safe to say that the followers of Christ didn't borrow anything.

It sounds to me that this tablet prophecy references Christ Himself. Again, I'd really like to see if there is a specific name on this tablet - which I'm guessing there isn't. Also, for some reason I thought the 400 yrs between the testaments was a quiet time in prophecy? Maybe this tablet was just translated from a previous source?

Starlight's picture

Kyle,

Good observations, I thought the same thing when reading this as it's typical of those looking for anyway to discredit Christ. Besides Daniel 9 prophesied that the Annointed one would be cut off which was hundreds of years before this stone.

I'm curious of your thought about the 400 years being a "quiet time". Could you eloborate?

Norm

Kyle Peterson's picture

Oh, I think I picked up the 400 yrs of silence from Sunday School or College. I really haven't studied it much, other than the inspired books in the OT seemed to cease (@400BC) perhaps as a fulfillment of Psalm 74:9. (1 Macc. 9:27) references a silent period where there were no prophets and I think the Pharisees said something about no prophets until John (the Baptist).

Starlight's picture

Kyle,

Yea, I was wondering as Daniel sure prophesied a lot of goings on during that period of time ;-)

Plus the early Christians of the 40 years from Pentecost to AD70 sure didn't think Enoch and Jubilees were quiet regarding prophesy.
(Jude 14 Enoch, the seventh from Adam, PROPHESIED about these men: "See, the Lord is coming with thousands upon thousands of his holy ones"

Enoch and Jubilees are purpoted to have been written about 100 to 200 years before Christ.

Norm

JL's picture

Norm,

But what if Enoch actually wrote Enoch before the Flood?

Blessings,

JL Vaughn
Beyond Creation Science

Kyle Peterson's picture

Norm,

I think it's important to differentiate between prophetic events occuring and prophecy being voiced. No doubt the events which Daniel predicted happened during this 'silent time' but there does not appear to be active prophecy going on.

Regarding Enoch, we can't be exactly sure when it was written. However, what the text does say is that Enoch, the seventh from Adam prophesied. Enoch existed long before 400BCE thus placing him well before the so called 'silent time'.

Starlight's picture

Kyle,

Yep again, we really don't know when Enoch was written and as Jeff surmises it may go way back.

I guess again that since Dan 9 said that vision and prophecy would be sealed up at the consummation then we could rightfully expect there "may" have been prophecy during the 400 years. I like Jeff just think that those who want to control the discussion like to throw that silent time out there without any sound support although they may be possibly correct.
I would not bet the farm on it though.

Norm

JL's picture

Norm,

It's a Protestant tradition. It makes it easier to discredit the "intertestamental" books without any thought.

Blessings,

JL Vaughn
Beyond Creation Science

Ransom's picture

:) Nice one, Jeff. :)

JL's picture

Hebrew has no tense, so it's going to be difficult to tell whether a faded, broken text is talking about a past or future event.

I'd question any dating based on writing style that can date something accurately to within a decade or two, unless there was a castastrophic event on one side. An individual scribe tends to use the same writting style over a lifetime.

Blessings,

JL

Blessings,

JL Vaughn
Beyond Creation Science

Parker's picture

I think this tablet, if authentic, lends enormous support of Christian claims about messiah.

Forever Jews have been saying that a suffering, dying, rising messiah had no place in authentic Hebrew thought. It was said to have been a late christian contrivance and probably just borrowed from the pagans anyway.

But this tablet would show that Hebrew concepts about what messiah was expected to do *included* the notion of a suffering, dying, and rising again. This is quite remarkable.

mazuur's picture

Parker,

I think it is clear from the Scriptures that the Jews did not have the understanding that the messiah was to suffer and die. Yes Jesus pointed it out to his disciples, but even they had the misunderstanding that the messiah was to led them in revolt over Rome and once again become a great nation like under Solomon. Thus, their complete dismay when Jesus was put to death.

Rich

-Rich

Parker's picture

Hi Rich. Jesus demonstrates that they did have the concept in their tradition and scriptures, even if it was not a popular one easy to grasp in the face of Israel's occupation by foreign governments. This tablet, if authentic, gives examples of other Jewish groups who knew of a similar messianic concept. And that's remarkable.

There are about a dozen historically-reported Jewish messiahs between the years AD 1 to AD 70, each having a slightly different "messiah concept" they embodied (though nearly all shared "national liberator" as a key attraction).

Jesus likewise offered liberation to the Jews. Only, his way of holiness promised preservation and escape from the predicted doom of the Roman-Jewish War so as to establish His Nazarene sect as a worldwide nation. The Nazarenes accomplished the vision of their leader, and the rest of the sects (Sadducees, Essenes, Zealots, Pharisees) went extinct.

Starlight's picture

For those interested, here is a more in-depth discussion on MSNBC which talks about some of the points we have raised. Also there is a link to the English translation so that one can read the text for yourself that I have listed below as well.

http://cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2008/07/07/1184950.aspx

http://www.bib-arch.org/news/dssinstone_english.pdf

Norm

chrisliv's picture

Yeah,

Maybe Christ even had partially in mind this tablet or its story, when He said:

"All that ever came before me are thieves and robbers: but the sheep did not hear them." John 10:8

Peace to you all,
C. Livingstone

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